The Final Form of My Podcast

I have, finally, settled on a podcast format that gels with my type of gab about modern-day gladiators like a glove.

Since plummeting into a world of podcasting, the names of shows, their designs, and delivery systems of content has morphed over time. I dabbled in various niches of the sport; therefore, each show had a thematic structure all its own, allowing the unique aspect of MMA hitting the airwaves to seep through the speakers.

MMAGOLD Podcast

The first podcast I established was when I collaborated with MMAGOLD—a team featuring fighters from the amateurs to those in the upper echelon, such as Max “Pain” Griffin and Anthony “Fluffy” Hernandez—as their “media guy.” As one might expect, the premise of every show centered around the athletes rising the ranks within the walls of the team’s gym, Urban Sprawl Fitness, housed in El Dorado Hills.

NorCal MMA Podcast

Although there was a deep cast of killers to broadcast about from MMAGOLD’s violence vault, it was evident how much talent resided throughout the remainder of my region, and I wanted to collect it all, which led to my creation of norcalmixedmartialarts.com (an active site collecting dust at the moment) and an assortment of podcast attempts, regardless of name and method of recording, under, essentially, a show most commonly referred to as: The NorCal MMA Podcast.

I enjoyed, as most MMA fans, chatting about issues as they arose from every corner of the globe, but any conversations under the NorCal MMA banner, either independently or with special guests, examining MMA’s broader picture felt like jamming a puzzle piece into a space it didn’t quite belong.

Check-In with @DaveMMAdden

Prior to unplugging the NorCal MMA Podcast, along with everything else associated with my NorCal MMA project, I found a comfortable groove for hosting shows via a live stream, a preferable means for engagement and, more often than not, inviting greater depth, than simply breadth, to the topic at hand.

In the end, preparing a show aimed with specific bullet points was missing its intended mark on my bullseye of pleasure.

The New & Improved Check-In with @DaveMMAdden

New? Yes! improved? I like the concept, and hope you give the show a listen and judge for yourself. 

Aside from interviewing competitors before they stepped into the cage, I always looked forward to weekends when I’d be live streaming events on the NorCal MMA Facebook Page. When I’m watching a big fight card—I know, they all are—from home, I will explore the thoughts of others online about what is occurring in real-time. The same interactions I’d share with those of interest transpired within my own feed. More importantly than a bustling comments section, a community formed. Nobody necessarily tuned in for me—they wanted, understandably, to see their favorite fighter, friend, or relative play punchy-face—but we all had a blast watching the drama unfold before our eyes.

I recently posted in my Instagram story an idea about watching past bouts— UFC, Bellator, or otherwise—with me during a live stream:

The response was overwhelming. Of course, MMA fans are an extremely nostalgic bunch and can’t resist a flashback to their favorite moment(s). Some selections included: Rory MacDonald versus Robbie Lawler at UFC 189, Derrick Lewis versus Francis Ngannou at UFC 226 (though I’m not sure why), Pat Barry versus Cheick Kongo at UFC on Versus 4, and many others.

For Episode 31 of Check-In with @DaveMMAdden (link: davemmadden.podbean.com/e/check-in-with-davemmadden-episode-31), I powered on my Instagram’s live feed and watched a few fights with my followers. On the debut of this particular podcast, I revisited scraps featuring the Diaz brothers.

Future episodes of the show will stream on Thursdays at 7 pm (Pacific). If you are unable to join me live on my Instagram page and, for some reason or another, miss the twenty-four hour window before it vanishes, the audio from every show will be uploaded to my Podbean account (link: davemmadden.podbean.com).

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