Cash Me at Rokfin: How Bout Dat?

When I was returning from the digital grave and revitalizing my pulse on MMA Instagram, I debated another romp through the Interweb under some clever addition to my name with the acronym “MMA,” but, instead, I decided upon the username: @MeMeAmusement.

In my last blog, Dawn of A New Username (link here), I introduced my location on cyberspace’s densely populated, never-ending roadmap of possibility and how my disposition didn’t leave me stranded on the side of the road after my previous account, @DaveMMAdden, was disabled, though I never revealed the path I’d be forging. 

Prior to the close of 2018, a majority of my weekends were spent supporting the amateur and professional mixed martial artists surrounding my neck of Northern California and the Central Valley. I hosted podcasts, live streamed fights, wrote articles, and invested countless hours to bring attention to the wealth of talent within the walls of the Golden State’s upper half. Although my two years as NorCal MMA’s biggest cheerleader imprinted many fond memories, a range of issues, detailed in a blog entitled 54 Reasons MMA Media Isn’t For Me (link here), forced me to vacate the space I had shoveled out for myself.

The tenth reason from my list stated: “I find humor in MMA—usually to distract me from the side of the sport that’s saddening when analyzed too thoroughly. Memes are a great way to shed light on heavy situations. Unfortunately, jokes don’t jive with everyone. If you choose to make memes, there will be battered feelings—trust me.” It was strange: several people who revered my efforts in waving Northern California’s banner labeled me as a charlatan because I didn’t tickle their funny bone—a bone that, in my opinion, tapped out on these individuals long beforehand. 

In the opposing corner of negativity about producing memes, I received plenty of praise; I also realized, once I retired my desire to fill the shoes of a journalist, the cult following of many meme accounts. Not only were the side-splitting images enticing, they coincided with the day’s headlines in a timely manner; they were the news and all its fluff stuffed into a package that fit perfectly inside my phone’s frame.

I envisioned a bigger possibility for MMA memes, something with a little more depth than simply stamping some imprints on social media. By pairing up with Rokfin, a site hosting content created by mixed martial artists, Jiu-Jitsu practitioners, comedians, podcasters, and range of other genres, there is an opportunity, with your follow and endorsement at rokfin.com/MeMeAmuement, to earn some financial compensation. 

I’m not saying I will make enough money to purchase the UFC, but I do believe there is a substantial amount of interest amongst MMA fans for memes that can’t be found in their social media feed—maybe enough to purchase a UFC pay-per-view. In addition to my exclusive memes, several other entertaining MMA Instagram accounts, such as As Shopped As It Gets (link here), Daily Dose MMA (link here), and MMA Island (link here), will also share unique memes that can only be accessed via the Daily MMA Memes Channel: rokfin.com/MeMeAmusement

Some of the content found at Rokfin is free, whereas other content is packaged as “premium.” To access anything premium, visitors can do so for ten-dollars per month. I know: another charge for another area of your interest, right? Truth be told, I will create bundles of premium memes that highlight particular fighters or topics, but the Daily MMA Memes Channel will publish memes—daily—free of charge. If the idea of subscribing to Rokfin for MMA memes doesn’t strike you, high profile MMA personalities, including Ben Askren, Adam Hunter, Chael Sonnen, Nick Diaz, as well as others being added as we speak, may cause you to submit, open your wallet, and become a monthly subscriber.

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